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COVID-19 Vaccination Sites

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Mount Zion Baptist Church
Antioch Location
2261 Murfreesboro Rd
Nashville, TN


March 20, 2021 9AM – 1PM

Open to individuals 65+ and those
16+ with high-risk comorbidities

If you need assistance, please call

615.254.7296 ext. 2700

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Metro Public Health Department is

 currently offering the COVID-19 vaccination to eligible residents.  Appointments are required.  To schedule an appointment, click the link above.  For more information on the Metro Public Health Department vaccine distribution phase and status click here.

 

 For assistance call (615) 862-7777.

Latest News on COVID-19:

Stay tuned for updates...

Current State of COVID-19

As COVID-19 continues to affect every aspect of our daily lives, we must stay diligent in helping to mitigate the spread of the virus in our families and communities, even as vaccinations become increasingly available. The
COVID-19 vaccine is ONLY ONE of many important tools to help us stop this pandemic. Even after getting vaccinated, especially with the emergence of new variants, YOU STILL MUST adhere to the following to protect yourself and others around you:

 

● Wear a mask over nose and mouth
● Stay at least 6 feet away from others
● Avoid crowds
● Avoid poorly ventilated spaces
● Wash your hands often


It’s important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic. This will allow us to get back to a sense of normalcy sooner rather than later.

 

People who have received both of their vaccine shots, and have waited until they take effect, will be able to do things that unvaccinated people cannot — like having meals together and hugging their grandchildren. But until the pandemic is defeated, all Americans should wear masks in public, help unvaccinated people stay safe, and contribute to a shared national project of saving every possible life.


To help guide decisions about how to distribute limited supplies of the COVID-19 vaccine, the CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have designated high priority groups while supplies are limited. For the state of Tennessee, you can visit the following website to determine your eligibility and, if eligible, register for an appointment: https://covid19.tn.gov/


For vaccination information for other states, you can visit the following site: https://www.walgreens.com/findcare/vaccination/covid-19

COVID-19 FAQs

1. Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19? No. None of the COVID-19 vaccines contain the live virus that causes COVID-19, so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

 

2. After getting a COVID-19 vaccine, will I test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test? No. Neither the recently authorized and recommended vaccines nor the other COVID-19 vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States can cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. If your body develops an immune response—the goal of vaccination—there is a possibility you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.

 

3. If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine? Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, the vaccine should be offered to you regardless of whether you already had a COVID-19 infection. The CDC is providing recommendations to federal, state, and local governments about who should be vaccinated first. At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long. We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have more data on how well the vaccines work. Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are trying to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

 

4. Will a COVID-19 vaccination protect me from getting sick with COVID-19? Yes. COVID-19 vaccination works by teaching your immune system how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19, and this protects you from getting sick with COVID-19. Being protected from getting sick is important because even though many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness, have long-term health effects, or even die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you don’t have an increased risk of developing severe complications. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

 

5. Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA? No. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Messenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNA vaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the mRNA cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work. At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. That immune response and making antibodies is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.

 

6. What are the ingredients for the COVID-19 vaccines? The two COVID-19 vaccines currently available in the United States do not contain eggs, preservatives, or latex. For a full list of ingredients, please see each vaccine’s Fact Sheet:

 

a. Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine

b. Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

 

7. When can I get the vaccine? Because the supply of COVID-19 vaccines in the United States is currently limited, the CDC is providing recommendations to federal, state, and local governments about who should be vaccinated first. Each state has its own plan for deciding which groups of people will be vaccinated first. You can contact your state health department for more information on its plan for COVID-19 vaccination. Additionally, please make sure you have signed up for the Mt. Zion text alerts, as information will be distributed to the entire congregation as it is received. Text “mtzion” to 63975 to receive text alerts.

 

The goal is for everyone to be able to get a COVID-19 vaccination easily as soon as large quantities of vaccine are available. As the vaccine supply increases, more groups will be added to receive vaccination. Learn more about CDC recommendations for who should get vaccinated first.

 

8. What can I do now to protect myself from COVID? To protect yourself, follow these recommendations:

 

a. Wear a mask over your nose and mouth

b. Stay at least 6 feet away from others

c. Avoid crowds

d. Avoid poorly ventilated spaces

e. Wash your hands often

 

Get more information about these and other steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

 

9. Do I still need to wear a mask and socially distance from others even if I have received two doses of the vaccine? Yes. Not enough information is currently available to say if or when CDC will stop recommending that people wear masks and avoid close contact with others to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic. To protect yourself and others, follow these recommendations:

 

a. Wear a mask over your nose and mouth

b. Stay at least 6 feet away from others

c. Avoid crowds

d. Avoid poorly ventilated spaces

e. Wash your hands often

 

Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations for how to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19.

 

10. How many shots of the vaccine are needed? The currently authorized vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in the United States require 2 shots to get the most protection:

 

a. Pfizer-BioNTech doses should be given 3 weeks (21 days) apart

b. Moderna doses should be given 1 month (28 days) apart

 

You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval. Additional COVID-19 vaccines are in Phase 3 clinical trials. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.

 

11. What is being done to distribute the vaccine? The federal government oversees a centralized system to order, distribute, and track COVID-19 vaccines. All vaccines are ordered through the CDC. Vaccination providers receive vaccines from the CDC’s centralized distributor or directly from a vaccine manufacturer.

 

12. Is the vaccine safe for those that are pregnant or breastfeeding? People who are pregnant and part of a group recommended to receive the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to be vaccinated. If you have questions about getting vaccinated, talking with a healthcare provider may help you make an informed decision. While breastfeeding is an important consideration, it is rarely a safety concern with vaccines. No data is available yet on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or on the effects of mRNA vaccines on breastfed infants or on milk production/excretion. mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to breastfeeding infants. People who are breastfeeding and are part of a group recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, such as healthcare personnel, may choose to be vaccinated.

 

13. Is the vaccine safe for someone with an underlying medical condition? People with underlying medical conditions can receive the FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines provided they have not had an immediate or severe allergic reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine or to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Learn more about vaccination considerations for persons with underlying medical conditions. Vaccination is an important consideration for adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions because they are at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19. If you have questions about getting vaccinated, talking with a healthcare provider may help you make an informed decision.